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Readers Respond: How Do You Get Better Sleep When Your IBD is Flaring?

Responses: 7

By

Updated October 18, 2011

From the article: Why IBD Affects Your Sleep
The fatigue that comes with IBD is unrelenting. But even though you need sleep, sometimes it's hard to get it. I always had a hard time sleeping, and would wake up several times a night only to run to the bathroom. Other times I would wake up in a cold sweat and have to change my clothes and blankets. Being hospitalized was even worse, with sleep being interrupted all night long by nurses administering medication or taking vitals. Even now with my j-pouch, I don't always get to sleep through the night.

Sound Sleep

I currently have a J-pouch and I sleep right through mostly throughout the night as we have supper at 6pm already. I am so used to not eating after that. It also depends on what I have had during the day. On the odd occassion I will get up at 1 in the morning, but this doesn't really interfere with my sleeping pattern.
—Wilhelminajay

Reading poetry

I get all ready for bed, then spend 15 minutes reading poetry aloud before I turn out the light. I think this works for two reasons -- the rhythm of the words is soothing (maybe it reminds me of being read to as a child) and the images the poetry evokes takes me away from my day to day worries, so I don't like awake thinking of the things I forgot to do or need to do.
—Guest Susan

Meditation

I find that, if I've done everything else that I can to calm my physiology, meditation in bed helps me quite a bit. I usually get a good session and then fall asleep. Meditation is great not only for sleep, but for general stress relief, so I find that this makes daytime meditation easier for me, too.
—Guest Elysse

Music is my Therapy

I don't have IBS, but I do deal with interrupted sleep a lot for other health reasons. I find that listening to calming music makes it easier for me to fall asleep - If I am at the hospital, I often keep my ipod handy for when I am waked up. I turn it on and fall back asleep more easily.
—Guest Connie G.

Meditation tape

I find that if I listen to a meditation tape right before bed, I am able to fall asleep more quickly.
—Guest bonnie

Stick With Same Bedtime Every Night

I don't always follow this rule, but maintaining a consistent sleep schedule will help me sleep better. If I get up at the same time every morning and also retire at the same time every night my body responds positively.
—Guest lila

jani2@vodamail.co.za

I find that if i stick to 5 small meals a day with no irritating foods to upset my J pouch and take a sachet of Fybogel with breakfast, that this plays apart in sleeping without having to get up to run to the bathroom. I have to make sure that i have my last meal at least 2 hours before i retire. This sometimes does the trick but its not cast in stone. I often wake up really thirsty and crave somthing sweet. Maybe someone can answer that one for me. greetings from cape Town South Africa
—Guest janis hopley

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